My Many Colored Feelings

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Children will love to explore their emotions with the My Many Colored Feelings activity.

Putting colors to emotions has been going on for centuries. After all, some people believe that the expression “green with envy” goes back to Shakespearian times.

social skills activity that uses colors to define feelings

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Carol Gray made putting colors together with feelings popular with her comic strip conversations.

This list is her suggestions for colorful emotions:
Green: Good ideas, happy, friendly
Red: Bad ideas, angry, unfriendly
Blue: Sad, uncomfortable
Yellow: Frightened
Black: Facts, truth
Orange: Questions
Brown: Comfortable, Cozy
Purple: Proud
Color Combinations: Confused
 My Many Colored Feelings Using color and art to explore emotions
It is important to remember that these are suggestions. For colors to have a true personal meaning then each person has to define their own colors. You can see in our examples the children chose different colors for their feelings.
Target Skills:
Processing Emotions
Theory of Mind
Materials:
Paper
Pens, paint or colored pencils
Instructions:
Make colored circles on a paper.
Ask what emotion each color represents to them. Have them draw the expression on the colored circle that matches the feeling that they chose.
Use a mirror or have the children observe each other as they model the feeling.
Have the child pay attention to the way the arms and legs are drawn, paying attention to whether the body matches the expression.
Ask the child to mimic with their face and body what they drew.
When the drawing is complete, talk about when they felt angry, sad, confused, etc.
Problem solve with them about what they could do when they have those feelings.

Talk about when they experienced someone else being angry, confused, proud, happy, etc.

Why do they think that the other person felt that way?

Keep the picture they made as a reference. Check back with them after a few weeks. Do the colors still match the feelings for them?

Have them use the feelings characters to tell a story. It can be about a pretend situation or you can guide them to tell a story about a real life event.
Many Colored Feelings
More fun ways to explore feelings and learn how to regulate emotions: 
Printable social skills Game
Printable Social Skills Game
texture people craft activity
Texture-People

 


 

Bedtime Buddies
Bedtime Buddies
Stick Up For Your Feelings Social Skills Game
Social Skills Game

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