Our Tips for Soothing the Anxious Child

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Soothing the Anxious Child can be challenging. Much like the rise in the rate of autism, anxiety disorders are also becoming more prevalent. More and more of the children that we work with are showing signs of anxiety. You can read more about the Epidemiology of mental disorders in children and adolescents here. Psychology Today give their point of view on why this is so. Some of the reasons given are less free play time as well as putting more emphasis on extrinsic goals rather than intrinsic goals, causing the child to worry about whether they are pleasing others. While we agree with both points we have seen children who are far too young to have been influenced by these factors, pointing to a biological difference. Whatever the reason, helping any child who is anxious, whether it is a personality trait or rises to the level of a disorder, is critical to their future happiness. Over the years we have collected tools and strategies to help children take control of their anxiety. Different strategies work with different children and situations. Choose the strategies for soothing the anxious child that fit with your child’s personality and needs.

Window of Calm

 

First identify whether the root cause is specified or unspecified. One boy, who had an anxiety disorder, would tantrum in preschool whenever there was an art project. This worry turned out to be specified; he was worried that he wouldn’t like the way things felt and he wouldn’t understand what to do. I told him that he could take his time and then make a choice. We would stand back and observe the activity so that he understood the directions. If the activity involved getting messy (he didn’t like that either) I would reassure him about how we would take care of his feelings: have a paper towel ready to wipe his hands right away, etc. After a few times of hanging back he realized he enjoyed art time and it was no longer a problem. An example of an unspecified worry would be if the child is worried about getting hurt when there was no real reason to expect hurt or injury. Unspecified worries have a tendency to run in a loop in the brain and we need to help interrupt and decrease the repetition of those thoughts.

Soothing the Anxious Child

Implement an “Anxiety Abatement Diet”
Much like a sensory diet, it is helpful to incorporate relaxing techniques into the day. These interventions should be done daily as much as possible. This will be incredibly beneficial when they get older and need to manage their own symptoms and have already established healthy habits.
Meditation. Here are two resources you can try:
Guided Sleep Meditation for Kids and Parents
Meditation for Children
Heavy Muscle Work.
Brushing and Deep Pressure.
You can find information on heavy muscle work, brushing and deep pressure here: Sensory Integration Strategies and Tips

Physical Interventions:
Swinging, swimming and running are great exercises to help calm the system. More physical interventions are covered in the Sensory Integration link above.
Hand press: Press the hands together firmly while taking deep breathes.

hand press

 

 

 

 

 

Cognitive Interventions:
To help work through the issue or event causing anxiety use writing and Chasing Away Nightmaresdrawing.

-For very young children, have them draw a picture so you can talk about it. Like this picture about nightmares.

-For young children help them to draw a comic strip. What would a super hero do?
-For older children, have them write in a journal or write a story about the worry. Encourage them to find a solution in their story. One boy I knew had such a difficult time dealing with his feelings that I had him create a character. In the beginning, in every story he wrote his character was the “hero” who knew just what to do and the character’s sister was the one who got anxious and acted out. I knew we had made real progress when the main character (the boy) began to be the one who was anxious and the one who came up with solutions to keep calm.

Rate Your Feelings.
-I have children make a scale of 1-5. 1 is “no big deal” while a 5 would mean get help immediately. If something is a 2, 3, or 4 work through strategies on how to turn it into a 1.

 

Meter ExampleMake a Worry Meter.

I use meters for all sorts of social-emotional topics. I find that they really help both to put things in perspective and to remind us of possible solutions for calming down. Here is an example of one I made with a young boy. You can download pre-printed forms but I usually just draw one out real quickly. In this example, I showed a list of synonyms for anxious to the child. Then I had the child choose the words that they wanted. Then I asked him to come up with examples of when he felt that way and what were the possible solutions. I try to honor the words, placement and solutions that are chosen unless they are really far off the target.
Behavioral Interventions:
Set clear guidelines. Sometimes a child can be confused by ambiguity and that can cause anxiety. Be clear about what will happen and what behavior or input is required.
Mantras: You or your child come up with a chant to say when the “worry monster” appears. One boy would say, “Brain! Stop those silly thoughts!” Another child came up with “Worries, worries go away. Time to go have fun and play.”
Quiet calm down place. Sometimes a child is too upset to listen or participate in any of their solutions. Have a place that is quiet and comfortable where they can calm down. This is not a “time-out” it is okay to cuddle, give deep pressure, etc.
Specify worry time. If the anxiety is obsessive in nature it becomes counter-productive to keep trying to talk it out. Once the issue has been discussed, validated and possible solutions have been decided it is time to stop talking about the issue. Give them a “Worry Time”. At the end of the day allow 15 minutes to vent about the worry and then be firm that you are done talking about worrying.
Distraction. Sometimes we just need to live in the moment. Try to put more emphasis on something really fun and distracting.

That was a lot of information, wasn’t it? Congratulations for reading it all the way to the end! We hope you find Our Tips for Soothing the Anxious Child useful.

Planet Smarty Pants has Two Anti-Anxiety Tips for Kids go check them out. 

Related Articles:

Sensory Processing activities
Sensory Integration Strategies and Tips
Bedtime Buddies
Bedtime Buddies

39 Comments




  1. This was really helpful and interesting. I’m thinking a lot of these techniques would even work on adults. I have a daughter who would probably really appreciate these tips. Thanks so much for sharing this with us at the Inspire Me Mondays Link-Up!

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  2. Thank you for submitting to Motivation Monday!

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    1. Thanks for hosting!

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  3. My second son seems to suffer from anxiety – he is mush more worried and stressed by new or different things than any of hos brothers. We’ll try some of these and see if they help. Thanks for sharing to family-walker.co.uk

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    1. I hope some of the tips help!

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  4. My daughter has been showing signs of anxiety since starting kindergarten. It’s worrying because I have an anxiety disorder and it’s not something I’d wish on her. Thanks for the tips!

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    1. It is so wonderful that you are in a position to help her! Your understanding and awareness will surely be a key factor in giving her the tools that she needs.

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  5. Sharing this post because I think a lot of moms need to read this. To be honest even though I think about this a lot for myself but not my kids. It makes sense since their emotional health is as important as physical health. If we use this information to help our kids deal with their anxiety now they’ll be much happier adults. Thanks for linking up #rattleandroll

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    1. Thanks for sharing. It is our hope that if we can help create healthy habits for our kids then they can have a happy life.

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    1. Thanks, Tricia. We have found that some of these strategies are very useful at school.

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  6. As a newish mom (20 months) I never considered anxiety or so many other things that affect children. I learned so much from this post. I wish all parents and families well who are currently dealing with these conditions.

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    1. Thanks, MJ. That’s so nice of you.

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  7. Great ideas!!! Thanks for sharing at the #lovetolearnlinky. Please come share again and see the features including you :). Have a fun day!

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    1. That’s great, Katie. Thank you.

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  8. Interesting perspectives here! I recently wrote a post on child anxiety, too, and you have some different ideas than I thought of. Thanks for sharing them! (Stopping by from Mama Reads Monday)

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    1. We would love to read your ideas.

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  9. This is an amazing post of applicable techniques!! Thank you for sharing. I particularly like the idea of rating their feelings and/or drawing what’s making them anxious!

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    1. Thanks so much, Valerie. We have used these techniques with quite a few children. My favorites are the meters and using stories.

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  10. We like to use a quiet calm down place with our son. He is not prone to anxiety, but when he gets overtired and can’t deal with things, that it what works best for us.

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    1. You have a good point. These strategies can be used for a variety of situations.

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  11. Wow, such great tips! Love the idea of a worry mantra, as well as meditation. I try to go to meditation every week, and I’ve taught my daughter a little…I’m going to try to make it a regular part of her day. Can’t hurt to encourage great coping skills at a young age 🙂

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    1. Thanks, Meredith. We have found our 7 year old outside meditating. It’s so cute!

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  12. I like the idea of chasing away nightmares with drawing/writing. This is especially great for kids who don’t have great verbal skills.

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    1. You are so right, Melissa!

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  13. This is SO helpful and reassuring! I have a very thoughtful kid who often gets anxious as a result. I could use these tips for myself, as well!

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    1. Thanks, Leslie. We are so glad that it reassured you. There are so many ways that we can help our children and by helping them help ourselves.

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  14. Oh my gosh… I learned so much from this post! I think every child deals with anxiety at times, and with back to school coming up I think these tips will be very helpful!

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  15. This was helpful. One of my kids has auditory processing disorder and will occasionally have anxiety issues that are very challenging to deal with.

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    1. I am so glad that it was helpful for you.

      Reply

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